Video

BBC World News portrait of artist Ernesto Yerena


Extended version, produced and directed by Stefan Forbes, InterPositive Media LLC. This video depicts the personal and political journey of artist Ernesto Yerena.

Video

Touching Up a Revolution in Chicano Park

via: voice of san diego.org
After four decades, even murals painted with the heated passion of a revolution will start to deteriorate and chip, their tint fading as thousands of cars thunder overhead every day on the Interstate 5 and Coronado bridge freeways.
But there’s some new color gleaming from the freeway columns in Chicano Park.
VOSD spent part of last week hanging out with some of the park’s original muralists, who’ve returned to bring vibrancy to the park again. Here’s a video they put together with NBC 7 San Diego.
Beginning last summer, artists have been descending again from around the country on the park that bears the work of their youth. Older now, they’ve cobbled together teams of their children and friends to help climb scaffolding and paint hard-to-reach corners. Eighteen murals will get this revitalizing touch by next summer.

The money for the restoration of 18 murals — $1.6 million — comes from a frequent foe here: the government.

Video



El Chicano, formed in East Los Angeles in 1970 - the year of the Chicano Moratorium - was one of the more explicitly political groups from the scene. Their manifesto was much aligned with the Chicano activists - their album Revolución showed members of the band sitting alongside Pancho Villa and Emiliano Zapata, revolutionary heroes to the movement.

In 1972, El Chicano stopped by the KCET studios to perform on the program Acción Chicano. Jesus Treviño - who earlier had produced and co-hosted 175 episodes of Chicano public affairs program Ahora! for KCET - created Acción Chicano as a reaction to the lack of Latino programming on public news outlets. KCET later helped to create the Latino Consortium, an organization aimed to share resources for airing Latino programming on public media outlets.

Sound Colour Vibration, a site dedicated to covering “timeless music, art and film from the past and present,” unearthed this YouTube gem of their performance of their song “El Grito.” (The clip is labeled 1971, but the program premiered in 1972 so it may be a case of mislabeling):

(via chicanoartmovement)

Source: kcet.org
Video

KCET:
Artist Roberto Chavez was born to parents who came to Los Angeles after the Mexican Revolution. He had an early fascination with drawing, and in high school decided to become an artist after viewing an exhibition of art at the May Company downtown. After earning degrees from Los Angeles City College and UCLA, Chavez became an instructor at East Los Angeles College and was later appointed chair of the Chicano Studies Department. Chavez co-founded the Ceeje Gallery, known for exhibiting figurative art.

CAM:
I was able to view Mr. Chavez artwork during Art Along the Hyphen: The Mexican-American Generation at The Autry in Los Angeles which was part of the Pacific Standard Time of exhibitions. Even though these artist were born way before my time, I felt a close relation to these Mexican-American artistas and was very inspired by the exhibit.
The piece that has stuck with me of Roberto’s work in the exhibition was “El Tamalito del Hoyo” which depicts one of the “homeboys” from the barrio El Hoyo in East Los Angeles.
This piece was also Mr. Chavez favorite work of his in the exhibition.

(via chicanoartmovement)

Source: kcet.org
Photo

So here we go with #9 of my top 100 Chicano art masterpieces for my virtual Chicano Art Museum. Most of you may know Mr. Garcia by one of his most iconic images the “Frida” woodcut from 1975 (Here). There are many good artistic images of Frida, but not many of Diego that I can recollect. I think this is a really great piece of Mr. Rivera and it will stick in your brain. I take delight in Mr. Garcia’s style and rich color palette. Great artist indeed.


RUPERT GARCIA D.R., 2010 22” x 20”, Edition of 50

(via chicanoartmovement)

Source: galeriadelaraza.org
Video


Artist Dora De Larios grew up in the Temple Street district near Silver Lake, California, which was then a neighborhood of Mexican and Nisei (second-generation) Japanese families. In college she studied with some of the foremost clay artists and instructors at the University of Southern California, graduating with degrees in ceramics and sculpture. Her clean lines and distinctive glazes moved clay - traditionally considered to be a “craft” medium - further into the realm of art.

CAM:
Dora De Larios was also part of the Art Along the Hyphen: The Mexican-American Generation at The Autry. My Favorite piece from the exhibit of Mrs. De Larios was her “Blue Plate Special” 1977, Porcelian dinner plates from twelve place settings commissioned for the White House.

(via chicanoartmovement)

Source: kcet.org
Photo
Curators
Rita Gonzalez, Howard N. Fox, and Chon Noriega
Description
Phantom Sightings: Art after the Chicano Movement is the first comprehensive consideration of Chicano art in almost two decades and the largest exhibition of cutting-edge Chicano art ever presented. The exhibition explores the experimental tendencies within current Chicano art, which is oriented less toward painting and polemical assertion and more toward conceptual art, performance, film, photography, and media-based art, as well as “stealthy” artistic interventions in urban spaces. An exhibition catalog by co-curators Rita Gonzalez, Howard N. Fox, and Chon A. Noriega is available from the University of California Press. It contains three essays that explore the topic in depth as well as more than two hundred color illustrations, twenty-five individual artist portfolios, and a wryly subversive chronology of significant moments in Chicano cultural history. The exhibition, which opened at LACMAon September 2008, traveled in the United States and Mexico.

Curators

Rita Gonzalez, Howard N. Fox, and Chon Noriega

Description

Phantom Sightings: Art after the Chicano Movement is the first comprehensive consideration of Chicano art in almost two decades and the largest exhibition of cutting-edge Chicano art ever presented. The exhibition explores the experimental tendencies within current Chicano art, which is oriented less toward painting and polemical assertion and more toward conceptual art, performance, film, photography, and media-based art, as well as “stealthy” artistic interventions in urban spaces. An exhibition catalog by co-curators Rita Gonzalez, Howard N. Fox, and Chon A. Noriega is available from the University of California Press. It contains three essays that explore the topic in depth as well as more than two hundred color illustrations, twenty-five individual artist portfolios, and a wryly subversive chronology of significant moments in Chicano cultural history. The exhibition, which opened at LACMAon September 2008, traveled in the United States and Mexico.

Video

Segment recorded in the early 1980s from the television show “Eye on LA”.


Here is a video you should watch on graffiti. In the video you can see ASCO founding member Willie Herron’s III mural “The Wall That Cracked Open,”(min 2:57) they also interview Chicano artist and East Los Streetscaper, George Yepes.

Photo Set

Nuestra Hermana WOC Photography Series :

Gracelia Iturbide

Graciela Iturbide is a 69 year old Mexican photographer born in 1942. Around 1970, Iturbide studied photography at the Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico.

The majority of her photography is black & white and uses natural life and whichever environment she is submerged in at the time.

Her first collection released was titled “Mujer Angel” and embodied her feminist views which continued to be weaved through her career. Her best known collection was shot in Juchitan, Oaxaca, a city where women dominated life. It was titled “Señora de Las Iguanas”. Out of this series, came a photograph named “Magnolia”, featuring a physically male person wearing a dress. This photograph challenged and discussed sexuality and gender in Mexico.

She is also the founder of Mexican Council of Photography. Her work can be found in many major museums including but not limited to: Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Museum of Modern Art, the Los Angeles County Museum of Art and the J. Paul Getty Museum.

(via withoutapology)

Source: nuestrahermana
Video

By Leslie Berestein Rojas

Con ganas: Meet political artist Ernesto Yerena

KPCC videographer Julie Platner recently caught up with artist Ernesto Yerena, the artist behind the familiar “We Are Human” poster of a smiling child holding flowers. Done in his signature shades of turquoise and light red, the poster is a collaboration with artist Shepard Fairey, with whom Yerena has worked as an assistant.

Yerena’s subjects have ranged from Cesar Chavez to Manu Chao, and like other young Latino artists who have become involved in immigrant rights activism, his art has been a common sight at rallies, on fliers, on t-shirts. He grew up as a fronterizo, born in in the Imperial Valley farming town of El Centro and raised between there and Mexicali across the border. He’s force behind Hecho Con Ganas, through which he distributes his work.


I really enjoyed Ernesto’s Interview on this video. He is truly one of the new wave of Chicano Artist who do it for a cause and not just for the quick $$$. C/S Ernesto.